Food & Global Food Market

We love, love, love the fact about something we can relate to. Here we have piled up some strangest & weirdest food facts of the planet you’ll be pretty surprised by what you’re eating…You might think these facts are false but believe us these are true facts!!

  • Ripe cranberries will bounce like rubber balls.

Cranberries have moderate levels of vitamin C, dietary fiber and the essential dietary mineral, manganese (each nutrient having more than 10% of the Daily Value per 100 g serving, as well as other essential micronutrients in minor amounts.

Cranberry juice is usually sweetened or blended with other fruit juices to reduce its natural tartness.

  • Consuming dairy products may cause

Dairy products or milk products are a type of food produced from or containing the milk of mammals, primarily cattle, water buffaloes, goats, sheep, camels, and humans. Dairy products include food items such as yogurt, cheese, and butter.

Excessive consumption of dairy products can contribute significant amounts of cholesterol and saturated fat to the diet which can increase the risk of heart disease, and cause other serious health problems.

  • Coconut water can be used as blood plasma.

Coconuts are known for their versatility ranging from food to cosmetics. The oil and milk derived from it are commonly used in cooking and frying, as well as in soaps and cosmetics.

Coconut water is the clear liquid inside coconuts (which are fruits of the coconut palm).

  • Chocolate was once used as currency. As early as 250 A.D., ancient civilizations of Mexico and South America, specifically The Mayans and the Aztecs, used the cocoa bean as a system of money.

A 100 gram serving of milk chocolate supplies 540 calories. It is 59% carbohydrates (52% as sugar and 3% as dietary fiber), 30% fat and 8% protein (table). Approximately 65% of the fat in milk chocolate is saturated, composed mainly of palmitic acid and stearic acid, while the predominant unsaturated fat is oleic acid

  • Milt, which is a delicacy around the world, is fish sperm.

Milt or soft roe also refers to the male genitalia of fish when they contain sperm, used as food. Many cultures eat milt, often fried, though not usually as a dish by itself.

  • Peanuts aren’t nuts, they’re legumes.

Peanuts are similar in taste and nutritional profile to tree nuts such as walnuts and almonds.

  • Ketchup

It was used as a medicine in the 1800s to treat diarrhea, among other things.

Tomato ketchup is often used as a condiment to various dishes that are usually served hot: French fries, hamburgers, hot sandwiches & hot dogs. Also used as an ingredient and dressing for snacks like potato chips.

  • Honey is made from nectar and bee vomit.

In a 100-gram serving, honey provides 304 kilocalories with no essential nutrients in significant content. Composed of 17% water and 82% carbohydrates, honey has low content of fat, dietary fiber, and protein.

Calcium sources

Calcium is a very necessary mineral, but when most of us hear calcium we automatically think milk – well think again because there are a plethora of calcium rich foods that are actually dairy free! Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the human body; it helps to maintain strong, healthy bones and teeth, supports our blood vessels, muscle function, nerve conduction and more.

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Food Safety

Food Safety – A panel discussion at the Global Food Safety Conference that took place Feb. 28 and featured the chief executive officers of some of the largest food and beverage companies quickly shifted away from the topic at hand to consumer trust and what’s at stake if the wave of nationalism and protectionism sweeping many federal governments in developed countries . . .

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Fresh food, revamping resolution

New Year’s resolutions will be top of mind for shoppers as they browse the store—leading them right to the produce department.

Old habits die hard, but a new year provides a fresh start for people resolved to break the pattern of the habits they would like to change or improve upon. Nearly half of consumers will make a New Year’s resolution, yet less than 10 percent will succeed in achieving their goals, according to some estimates.

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Food Safety & human element

BENTONVILLE, ARK. — Recently, everything from Listeria to E. coli to Campylobacter has given American consumers good reason to worry about the safety of their food. The industry has responded and is making every effort to improve the safety of food by utilizing science-based testing and sampling practices, detection technologies, food safety training and education, and multiple interventions.

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Grocery Shopper analysis

From the Store to the Stove, Acosta Research Shows Grocery Shopper Behavior Influenced by Engagement with Food

Today’s shoppers are seeking positive culinary experiences, making deliberate decisions from the store to the stove, including wanting to feel good about the foods they eat, have pride in the brands they buy and share their cooking journeys online. Ahead of the new year, research released today in the 13th edition of The Why? Behind The Buy™ from Acosta — a leading full-service sales and marketing agency in the consumer packaged goods (CPG) industry — details the choices and behaviors of grocery shoppers as they look to enhance how they purchase and consume food.

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healthy foods

Imagine a choice of foods that were tasty, nutritious and good for your health – i.e. they helped you maintain a healthy body weight, improved your overall mood, and reduced your risk of developing diseases.
This article provides details on the top ten foods considered to be the most healthy, according to surveys and sources across North America and Western Europe.

1 – Apples
Apples are an excellent source of antioxidants, which combat free radicals. Free radicals are damaging substances generated in the body that cause undesirable changes and are involved in the aging process and some diseases.
Some animal studies have found that an antioxidant found in apples (polyphenols) might extend lifespans.
Researchers at The Florida State University said that apples are a “miracle fruit”.

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candy cane

This holiday season, Americans will share and gift candy, enjoying their favorite wintertime treats in moderation. John Downs, president and CEO of the National Confectioners Association, offers insight on the role that chocolate, candy, gum, and mints can play in holiday traditions and celebrations.

How many Americans will celebrate the winter holidays by gifting chocolate and candy?

Downs: Eighty-five percent of Americans say they will likely give someone the gift of sweet treats this holiday season. Candy plays a special role in important holiday traditions. Candy canes, gumdrop-adorned gingerbread houses and chocolate coins are all synonymous with the holiday season. We are proud to be part of these time-honored celebrations and deliver all kinds of festive treats to consumers during this special time of year.

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acceptable-additives for processed meats

Additives play an important role in food processing, with many assisting in the production of affordable, quality and safe food. Though numerous meat and poultry processors are currently trying to eliminate chemical-sounding ingredients from product formulations, it is important to understand that some products, based on use, positioning and price point in the market, cannot be formulated to be so called “clean label.”

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